Posted by Neelam Goswami on January 19, 2011

It is already documented in an earlier study that women suffer allergic reactions to their spouse's seminal fluid.

Men may be allergic to their own semen
Now the novel study by Dutch researchers is suggesting that men who experience flu-like symptoms after ejaculating may be allergic to their own semen, according to Daily Mail.

This mysterious disorder is known as post orgasmic illness syndrome or POIS, which causes flu-like symptoms including fever, runny nose, stinging eyes, and sudden intense fatigue after an orgasm. These symptoms can last for up to a week.

The condition has been documented in medical journals since 2002, but little was known about what caused it and how it could be treated, reports the British tabloid.

Study details
The Dutch researchers published two studies in the 'Journal of Sexual Medicine' which demonstrate that the syndrome was allergic in nature and that it might be possible to make men prone to the problem.

To reach their findings, Marcel Waldinger, a professor of sexual psychopharmacology at Utrecht University in the Netherlands, and his colleagues studied 45 men with POIS.

Study findings
After the analysis, Waldinger and co-researchers noticed that the men did not reported sickness after masturbating without ejaculating. But the men whose semen moved from the testes, became ill, sometimes rapidly.

“They didn't feel ill when they masturbated without ejaculating, but as soon as the semen came from the testes... after that they became ill, sometimes within just a few minutes,” Daily quoted Waldinger as saying.

Thirty-three men of the study subjects agreed to undergo a standard skin-prick allergy test using a diluted form of their own semen.

Allergic reaction demonstrated
Of those, 29, or 88 percent, showed a positive allergic reaction, indicating an auto-immune response, or allergic reaction.

In the second study, Waldinger and his team used what is known as hyposensitization therapy- a well-known technique for treating allergies, on two of the volunteers.

They first injected the two men with very dilute solutions of their own semen, then over a period of months with more concentrated forms.

The team found that, after periods of one and three years, the men showed a significant reduction in their POIS symptoms. The researchers are now treating more patients, Waldinger said.

The researchers found that, after period of one and three years, the men showed a significant reduction in their POIS symptoms.

Waldinger’s team is now treating more POIS patients with hyposensitisation therapy, the researchers wrote in the journal.

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