Posted by Jaspreet Kaur on April 03, 2009

Granada, Spain, April 3: Daily cannabis use is linked to an increased risk of psychosis and schizophrenia, a latest research by the University of Granada, Spain suggests.

The latest study, published in Schizophrenia Research and European Psychiatry, studies and interviewed 92 people. Out of these, 50 had developed a psychosis but did not suffer from “abnormal neurodevelopment”. And out of the 50 who developed psychosis, 66 percent admitted to having consumed cannabis daily.

But these people led normal lives. They had friends and were well-off academically.

Cannabis, commonly known as marijuana or ganja, is a psychoactive drug obtained from a plant called Cannabis sativa. Lately, there has been a rise in the instances of cannabis use by humans for recreational, spiritual and medicinal purposes.

However, the possession, use or sale of psychoactive cannabis is banned in most parts of the world. This is mainly because of its ill-effects on the health. Prolonged use of cannabis can lead to an increased probability of heart attacks, strokes and brain disorders.

There are mainly two active ingredients in cannabis which affect the brain. The first, called cannabidiol (CBD), relaxes it. The second ingredient, called Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces temporary hallucinations and feelings of fear by switching off a regulator in the inferior frontal cortex.

Many studies conducted previously have also pointed towards the dangers posed to cannabis users.

A study published in the British Medical Journal on Nov. 23, 2003 had revealed that heavy cannabis consumption is linked to an increased risk of developing schizophrenia.

Another report, published in the British Medical Journal again, titled “Cannabis use and mental health on young people” showed that daily consumption of cannabis in young women is associated with a 5.6 times increase in the odds of getting affected by depressiondefine and anxiety.

Furthermore, if we take a look at the findings from London University’s Institute of Psychiatry, they clearly show a relationship between cannabis use and psychosis.

These study findings say that, though no user is safe, young people are more susceptible to developing schizophrenia, a potentially dangerous form of psychosis, which causes hallucinations, delusions and strange behavior, in young adulthood.

The marijuana plant

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